JULY 16-17 BIG DIG 2016 Archeology Project

Histon and Impington Village Society Archaeology Group

Another Successful Digging Weekend 16/17 July 2016

Download this report July Report  PDF   (ideal for printing)

Volunteers and hosts alike showed no reduction in enthusiasm and enjoyment in our fourth digging adventure – graced again by ideal weather. Our grateful thanks to those who made us all so welcome and for the much appreciated hot and cold drinks and the nibbles. We dug five test pits and again got further insight into what lies under the ground in Histon and Impington.

Starting out at Glebe Way

Starting out at Glebe Way

image002

Sieving in the shade at Cambridge Road

One surprise was the great variety of types of gravel at the bottom of the pits. Orange-yellow in Nun’s Orchard, lighter yellow in Church Street, yellow with large stones in Glebe Way and fine yellow with chalk in Cambridge Road.

Despite the nearness of Nun’s Orchard to Clay Street there was no clay, nor any sign of occupation in this very central location. Enterprising use was made there of a sieving machine borrowed from the Botanic Garden. Are we all redundant? No – probably not. The big bits still had to be sorted by hand and a careful watch kept for anything small or delicate.

Dig

Dig

 

image004

Dig

image005

Dig

image006

Sieve

image007

Sieve

image008

Sieve

Helen Stocks-Morgan from Oxford Archaeology East very kindly came to advise us on Saturday, which was a great help. We were joined also by friends from the CAMDIG Group in Chesterton and students from Hills Road College – many thanks to them all. Thanks too to our own committee members who give their time to help with all the necessary organising which ensures our success.

image009

Helen advising

image010

Easy sieve

image011

Orange gravel with post hole

We are particularly grateful to Adrian and Louise Mellish who very bravely came in at short notice to allow us to dig two pits at Church Street. The results could not have been more of a contrast. Near the house a dead hit on a Victorian waste pit produced a wide variety of finds: a smashed “creamer” to be reconstructed and someone’s toy horse – not to mention bones as a reminder of the nearby Victorian abbatoir. Deep under  the end of the garden we found medieval and Romano-British pottery – maybe also Iron Age – more evidence of early occupation near  the Church.

image012

Piecing together the creamer

 

image013

Lost Toy

image014

Butcher’s Bones

image015

image016

Pottery of many different periods from the garden at Church Street.

The pit in Cambridge Road showed the expected mainly arable use, but did produce one piece of medieval pottery – the oldest we have yet found in that area.

image017

Interesting finds at Glebe Way included a piece of Romano-British black-burnished ware and a spectacular intact  neck with a black coating on the inside and very coarse outer finish.

image018

image019

Thanks to Paul Blinkhorn this is now identified as Thetford ware, AD 900-1100, the  neck of a jug or socketed bowl.

image020

Where does this piece go?

 

 

July

Curtain call at Nun’s Orchard

Don’t forget the final digging date of the season on 6/7 August

Save